Let Me Tell You A Story – Amazon update

 

As promised a little while ago, yes it took longer than anticipated, my ebook Let me tell you a story while you sleep is now available on Amazon/Kindle.

I must confess that I still find Amazon troublesome to use and prefer Smashwords but aiming to please you, my dear readers, and giving you as many options as possible…

This will be a short update as I’m snowed under at work with lighting project that would be much more exciting if I had more undivided time to give each project. Anyone else who doesn’t like quick-fix solutions but prefer to do things “properly” the first time around? I confess to be a quality, not quantity, kind of person.

 

 

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Short-story Update

I have caved in! When I first started looking at self-publishing my short-story “Let Me Tell You A Story While You Sleep” I opted out of Amazon. I found it too complicated and all the tax rules a bit daunting. So, when I did finally publish, with a lot more knowledge behind me, and perhaps it wasn’t that much easier, I choose Smashwords.

I like the idea that Smashwords is a distributor, which has enabled me to have my ebook available at Barnes & Noble and Apple iBooks as well. However, I have had quite a few friends complaining that Smashwords is difficult because you have to register on their site first. Personally, I thought in my ignorance that that’s how most online shops work, but I stand corrected if this is not so.

So…Amazon…yesterday I started going through the process of uploading “Let Me Tell You A Story While You Sleep” there as well. The need for sleep, prevented me from completing the upload but if all goes as planned by the end of this weekend, you dear readers, will have the option of buying my book…on Amazon.

 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/726968

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/let-me-tell-you-a-story-while-you-sleep-liv-johannesson/1126484602?ean=2940154392140

 

Svera Jang

A friend let me borrow the book Svera Jang written by Seema Gill. It seemed very promissing, written by a woman originally from India who later lived in Denmark, various countries in Africa and eventually in England. It also promised to be very personal.

I love reading. It’s one of my favourite things to do and a good excuse while commuting or waiting, to hold your book as a barrier against people around you. But I also know that when I start being reluctant to read, I don’t really like the book I’m lugging around with me. Svera Jang is unfortunately one of those books. It’s one where I wonder why I even decided to continue reading with so many books on my wish-list. I suddenly prefer my mp3 to keep me company on the tube rather than my book.

I really wanted to like this book. It’s well written and in a very unusual style, with poetry to complement the story. Gill must have lived an extraordinary life but the book only gives a glimps of it and as I near the end of the book, I’m still wondering what her life story is and I feel a little bit let down that I have grasped so few of the facts.

A writer as good as Gill, should be appreciated and I hope that I’m simply not her reader.

New Boy

Those of you who have followed this blog for a while might have noticed that I’m a fan of Tracy Chevalier. One of the things that I like about her books is that they are so well written but also very varied which always has an element of surprise.

The latest book, New Boy, is part of a project where different authors have written new stories from Shakespeare’s many plays. Chevalier chose Othello. Even if I love Shakespeare, Othello is not one of my favourites, but I have never seen it performed on stage.

Chevalier has moved the story to the 1970’s at a school yard. The main characters are in their pre-teens when they still move easily between children’s games and the new interest in the opposite sex. Into this homogenious suburban school with white kids who have grown up together, arrives Osei – the son of a Ghanian diplomate.

The book was so easy to read, I plowed through the first few chapters without thinking. When the plot then started to thicken I thought: “no, I really don’t like Othello”. The ending however is so strong that I’ve had to change my mind. I do like Tracy Chevalier’s Othello very much and I think I need to go and see a theatre production of the play. Perhaps I misjudged this story many years ago.

In any case, well done Tracy Chevalier for pulling off transporting the story to its new setting the way she has done. It works brilliantly.

The Bonesetter’s Daughter

I don’t remember who it was among my friends who recommended that I’d read Amy Tan but finding her book The Bonesetter’s Daugther at the library I decided to give it a go. The recommendation was most likely to read The Joy Luck Club, which must be her most wellknown book but I often like the hidden gems. It’s rare that the most famous book, or song, movie etcetera, turns out to be my personal favourite.

This book posed some confusion. The modern day setting, that takes up the greater part of the first half of the book, didn’t really draw me in. It was well written enough to keep reading but I didn’t care too much about the characters and their lives. But…

Then starts a travel back in time to China before the second world war and shortly beyond. This storyline was facinating, exotic and transported me to a time, a place and lives I wouldn’t come across in other ways than through books. I loved this part of the book.

Since I had such different experiences of the same book, I do wonder if the storyline set in China would have worked on it’s own without the modern day reference, or would I have felt that something was missing, perhaps that the story didn’t go full circle without the three generations that feature in the book.

The only thing I can conclude is that Amy Tan certainly is a good writer worth reading more of. Maybe I should try Joy Luck Club after all.

 

Amy Tan

Let Me Tell You A Story While You Sleep

Last weekend, my long term project of self-publishing my short story Let me tell you a story while you sleep, came to its first conclusion. It’s been a long time coming, as I looked back and realised that the first draft for this story was written three years ago. It has been a steep learning curve and at times it has seemed impossible to get to “published” as life constantly threw things in the way. It therefore feels like a great accomplishment that it has now been completed. The ebook (only ebook this time) is available through Smashwords who also distribute to Barnes & Nobel, Kobo, and Inktera among others. I am still hoping to find my name on Apple ibooks. There are also several library services listed as their distributors. It was a difficult decision to use Smashwords instead of Amazon but in the end I preferred Smashwords’ services. The ideal would be a Smashwords located in the UK or at least in Europe with distribution all over the world.

Now I go into the next phase, to try to drum up interest for my book, or at least let possible readers know that it’s available. A new challenge and a new learning curve have begun. It also means that I can again focus more on writing new pieces. More about that in the next blog post.

If you wish to buy Let me tell you a story while you sleep visit Smashwords at the below link or check with one of their many distributors. At Smashwords you can read 35% of the book before buying. Happy reading! I hope you enjoy my story and stay put for what my next writing project will be.

 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/726968

Let Me Tell...You Sleep.A

A young woman, newly arrived in London, finds herself drawn into a romance she wasn’t looking for. Will this man prove her wrong about staying unattached, or is he going to be yet another empty promise?

Our Endless Numbered Days

It feels like it was a while since I picked up a fictional book that I really liked. I don’t even remember how I came across Claire Fuller but I started following her blog and that is how I found out about her debut book Our Endless Numbered Days. To my surprise I found a copy at my local library. Hurray for libraries!

It’s good to read a book by someone you know nothing about and where you know little about the story. You have no expectations and no preconseived notion of what the book is going to be like. From the start of this story though, you know that nothing is going to be what it appears to be.

The story is told through the perspective of Peggy, a 8-year old who lives in North London at the beginning of the story. Both her parents have their odd ways but everything has the appearance of being quite normal. However, by the time Peggy’s father leaves their home together with Peggy you know that this is not a normal family.

On the cover of the book it says: “Every parent lies. But some lies are bigger than others.” The consequences of the lies and the hidden truths in this story is impossible to preceive as you follow Peggy’s story. And I don’t think I have ever before in my life felt a need to re-read the last two chapters just to make sure I really understood it. Did it really end the way I first read it? It’s unusual that an author writes an ending that jars with you enough that you’re not sure you can trust what you just read.

There are so many interesting themes in this book as well, but just to name them feels like I would give away too much of the story. In the end, the only thing you can be sure of is that nothing is what you preceive it to be, even up to the last sentence of the book.

 

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